Mysterious China

 “In one of the more entertaining moments of COP22, the global climate conference held in Marrakech last week, the Chinese vice-foreign minister Liu Zhenmin, gave the absent US president-elect a short lesson in the history of climate diplomacy. Climate change, he explained, was not a Chinese hoax. In fact, long before the issue had been discussed behind the high vermillion walls of Zhongnanhai, China’s contemporary Forbidden City, it had been put on the global agenda by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change in the 1980s, supported by Ronald Reagan and George Bush (senior).”[1]

The whole world was waiting for the reaction of china once Trump declared to not continue with the Paris agreement to fight climate change. All fears disappeared when China stepped up as the new global climate leader after Trump’s victory. An explanation of this (unexpected) leadership role China is willing to take on can be found in the government’s 5-year plan, much of their political

An explanation of this (unexpected) leadership role China is willing to take on can be found in the government’s 5-year plan, much of their political behavior can be explained trough this plan. The new 5-year plan (2016-2020) boosts global sustainable development. It is not something that is just a political goal, also the Chinese people (living in cities) are quite engaged with sustainable development due to the high level of pollution in their cities, which affects their health and daily live’s. If the governmental data is reliable, China is definitely putting their money where their mouth is. The country’s coal consumption dropped in 2016 for a third year in a row. But since it is widely known that there is a lack of transparency of governmental practices, one must keep critical when seeing this data.

An other interesting political and economical aspect of China is that the government moves heaven and earth to provide jobs for their people. Big projects such as The Silk Road Economic Belt and the 21st-century Maritime Silk Road, also known as one Belt, One Road, are being developed. The One Belt, One Road is a development strategy and framework, proposed by Chinese Xi Jinping (the general secretary of the Communist party of China) that focuses on connectivity and cooperation among mostly Eurasia countries.

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An other interesting political and economical aspect of China is that the government moves heaven and earth to provide jobs for their people. Big projects such as The Silk Road Economic Belt and the 21st-century Maritime Silk Road, also known as one Belt, One Road, are being developed. The One Belt, One Road is a development strategy and framework, proposed by Chinese Xi Jinping (the general secretary of the Communist party of China) that focuses on connectivity and cooperation among mostly Eurasia countries. This enormous project reflects the role of the Chinese government. The government is everywhere. It takes fast, drastic and huge decisions in no time. I found it remarkable that when speaking with Chinese people, they all had nothing negative to say about their government and its actions. I have traveled a lot and in every country there is at least some negativity towards governmental institutions, but not in China.

Described aspects are just a tiny part of a larger whole of information we where given and things we explored in China. I came to China with a lot of questions, and I left the country with even more questions. What an interesting, totally different world it is.

 

 

 

[1] https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2016/nov/22/donald-trump-success-helps-china-emerge-as-global-climate-leader


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